The Regent Honeyeater is a flagship threatened woodland bird whose conservation will benefit a large suite of other threatened and declining woodland fauna. This project is supported by Central West Local Land Services, through funding from the Australian Government’s National Landcare Program. The project concluded with a tree-planting day at a two hectare site along the disused rail corridor at Gungal. & It has engaged a whole farming community in restoring remnant box-ironbark habitat for the endangered species still living in the district, and attracted ongoing support from a wide cross section of the community to help farmers with the on-ground works. Local Land Services customer portal coming soon! The bark strips form a thick, walled cup with cobwebs binding it together and fine dried grasses lining the nest. Their breeding events correspond with the flowering of food sources. Economic impacts. The community can get involved through community engagement events, or by bringing your binoculars and participating in our bird surveys. A range of other activities such as nest box placement and monitoring provide crucial habitat for rare mammals as well as valuable motivational experiences for visiting groups. The Regent Honeyeater Project was established to improve the landscape and environment of the Lurg Hills near Benalla and provide a more secure future for a number of threatened bird and animal species. The Regent Honeyeater has striking yellow plumage on its back and wings, with a black head, neck and upper breast. A behind-the-scenes look at the regent honeyeater breeding program (Photo supplied: Mick Roderick)(Suppied: Taronga Conservation Society) Satellite 'backpacks' for … But lots of other bird, mammal and insect species are benefitting from the restoration works. The striking Regent Honeyeater has a black head, neck and upper breast, a lemon yellow back and breast scaled black, with the underparts grading into a white rump, black wings with conspicuous yellow patches, and a black tail edged yellow. The massive scale of our tree-planting work has enormous benefits for landcare as well as for wildlife. Regent Honeyeater Project volunteers have successfully documented increases in protected species of animals and rare birds in areas planted as ‘biodiversity corridors’ – land parcels that are a minimum of 40 metres wide to allow sufficient space for species to establish and thrive. The Regent Honeyeater Project has established itself as one of the most active volunteer conservation projects in the nation. A key component of the project is to increase understanding and capacity of the community to be able to identify the Regent Honeyeater and the threats to their habitat, and engage landowners to actively manage and monitor the Regent Honeyeater habitat on their land. The project will implement a broad strategy of education and awareness raising of the need for Regent Honeyeater conservation and continue to inform, support and encourage landholders and community members to be involved in the conservation of the Regent Honeyeater … This project will enhance and restore Regent Honeyeater foraging habitat through grazing management, pest animal control, and weed control on private and public land. The project runs propagation and planting days each year, and organises nest box placement and monitoring activities. Regent Honeyeaters released in 2017 have also stunned researchers after successfully fledging three young on private land near Chiltern. Lowland fertile woodland areas have been cleared for agriculture and residential activity, reducing the extent of nesting and foraging habitat. The Regent Honeyeater Project has an exciting list of sites to plant this year as we continue into our 23rd year of rehabilitation and landscape connection. It is listed federally as an endangered species. It can also feed on insects and spiders, as well as native and cultivated fruits.The Regent Honeyeater is found in eucalypt forests and woodlands, particularly in blossoming trees and mistletoe. The Sleep Channel Recommended for you Identify the most suitable location in the Hunter Valley for protecting the regent “The sighting was an extremely exciting event for the resident who has revegetated habitat on their 900-hectare property for the Regent Honeyeater Project. The Regent Honeyeater is nationally listed as Critically Endangered. A long-running project to re-establish habitat for the rare Regent Honeyeater is showing positive results, thanks to dedication of volunteers and community members over the past 21 years. 2017 Regent Honeyeater Captive Release & Community Monitoring Project – Update #24 24 Jan. 2018 Stratford sighting BWOM was observed for around a week during mid-January in Kim’s garden and as the earlier photo demonstrated the Regent dined out on over ripening Apricots as well as hawking insects during its Stratford stay. The “Reaching out to the Regent Honeyeater” project aims to stabilise or improve the trajectory of the Regent Honeyeater by 2023. Restoration works involved planting 2100 grassy box woodland plant species which aims to improve habitat for the critically endangered Regent Honeyeater, a nomadic visitor to the region as well as many other native plants and animals. 20 were here. The Regent Honeyeater is a highly mobile species, following flowering eucalypts through box ironbark open-forest and woodland areas. The project involves two student tasks: 1. Visit our zoos to support our work to fight extinction. The Regent Honeyeater: On the Edge project provides quality educational material for teachers and secondary school students. Night Time in the mountains - 10 hours of HD Frogs, Crickets, Cicadas and other insects. The priorities of the Project are to protect and restore remnants and enlarge them by add-on plantings. It is badly affected by land-clearing, with the clearance of nectar-producing trees and the poor health of many remnants, as well as competition for nectar from other honeyeaters. May Fleming - NRM Senior Land Services Officer Phone (Coonabarabran Office): 02 6842 6605. The species inhabits dry open forest and woodland, particularly Box-Ironbark woodland, and riparian forests of River Sheoak. The Regent Honeyeater project. Almost 900 hectares of restored habitat is reducing salinity and erosion problems, and improving water quality, stock shelter and natural pest control. Summary The Regent Honeyeater Habitat Restoration Project is a landscape scale community effort to protect and restore all significant remnants of native woodland habitat in the agricultural district of the Lurg hills, Victoria. Adult plumage is predominantly black with bright yellow edges to the tail and wing feathers, while the body feathers (except for the head and neck) are broadly edged in pale yellow or white. Advice. Raise community awareness and support for the Regent Honeyeater. Credit: Dean Ingwersen. While focus is placed on the Regent Honeyeater, many other declining birds and mammals also benefit from the restoration project. The Pilliga Nature Reserve, Warrumbungle National Park, the Goonoo State Conservation Area and National Park, Burrendong Dam, and the Weddin Ranges are the priority areas for this project. While efforts are made to ensure the accuracy of the ecological information contained in MERIT, for confirmation of authoritative data please contact the Department of … The project will be undertaken in collaboration with Birdlife Australia and the Australian National University (ANU) under the National Regent Honeyeater Monitoring Program (NRHMP). We are a not-for-profit organisation, so all donations go towards our conservation work. Description The Regent Honeyeater is a medium-sized honeyeater, about 23 cm long and weighs 31–50 g as an adult (with males generally larger and heavier). The small population size and restricted habitat availability make the species highly vulnerable to extinction due to loss of genetic diversity. The Regent Honeyeater Project in the Lurg Hills, near Benalla in Victoria, is a habitat restoration project that emphasises that a key to biodiversity conservation is working well with the people who live in the landscape. Help The Regent Honeyeater Project is helping to restore vital habitat for this endangered species whose numbers have been in serious decline over recent decades. National Parks and Wildlife, New South Wales takes the lead role for the Recovery Plan which is under review. Funding for recovery actions has been throug… The cup-shaped nest is thickly constructed from bark, lined with soft material, and is placed in a tree fork 1 m to 20 m from the ground. The Regent Honeyeater recovery team is administered by BirdLife Australia’s Woodland Birds for Biodiversity project with a Regent Honeyeater recovery co-ordinator. The project will increase the knowledge of the abundance of birds and their location within the Central West. The greatest threats posed to the Regent Honeyeater include habitat loss and the Noisy Miner. Victorian Naturalist 110: 49-50. The Regent Honeyeater breeds in individual pairs or, sometimes, in loose colonies, with the female incubating the eggs and both sexes feeding the young. - Duration: 10:00:02. This project will enhance and restore Regent Honeyeater foraging habitat through grazing management, pest animal control, and weed control on private and public land. Image: Regent Honeyeater. The project, through funding from the Australian Government’s National Landcare Program, is working to maximise the opportunity for the Regent Honeyeater to continue to exist in the wild. Regent Honeyeaters are very clever nest builders! It is commonly considered a flagship species within its range, with the efforts going into its conservation having positive effects on many other species that share its habitat. And a pair of captive-bred regent honeyeaters released in 2017 have stunned researchers after successfully fledging three young on private land near Chiltern. The regent honeyeater (Anthochaera phrygia) is a critically endangered bird endemic to southeastern Australia. Join the Regent Honeyeater Project and take part in tree planting days. Their nests are constructed of strips of eucalypt bark, dried grasses and other plant materials. Australian Government's Grants to commemorate the 25th Anniversary of Landcare. The Regent Honeyeater range is limited to the inland/western slopes of the Great Dividing Range, and coastal regions of the Hunter Valley and Central Coast of NSW. It has a bare, corrugated pale … Conservation actions in Victoria are undertaken in line with a National Recovery Plan 1999-2003 and in conjunction with a Recovery Team comprising Victorian and interstate representatives. The Regent Honeyeater is called the ‘flagship species’ and is the public face of the project as it gives the community a focus and a way to understand the environmental benefits of becoming involved. The Regent Honeyeater Project has established itself as one of the most active volunteer conservation projects in the nation. In males, the dark eye is surrounded by yellowish warty bare skin. The Regent Honeyeater is nationally listed as Critically Endangered.The project will increase the knowledge of the abundance of birds and their location within the Central West. Loss of key habitat and foraging tree species such as Mugga Ironbark, Yellow Box, White Box and Swamp Mahogany contributes to the population decline of the species. Regent Honeyeater Project This project is partially funded through the Goulburn-Broken Catchment Management Authority and the Australian Government's National Landcare Programme. The Regent Honeyeater (Anthochaera phrygia) is a spectacular, black, white and gold, medium-sized honeyeater. It aims to increase understanding of threatened species conservation and conservation management. Parks, Flora and Fauna Division Department of Natural Resources and Environment PO Box 500 East Melbourne Vic 3002 May 1999. It really is a demonstration of the changes needed for ecologically sustainable development. Operating in the Lurg Hills, just outside Benalla, the project began 13 years ago with the aim of protecting these striking birds, of which only 1000 – 1500 remain in the wild today. Propagation and planting days are organised each year for a thousand students from more than 20 local schools and hundreds of volunteers from universities, walking clubs, church groups, bird observers, scouts, environment groups and the like. Critically endangered regent honeyeater Rare regent honeyeaters, bred in captivity have been spotted feeding a young fledgling on private property in Greta West. And donate if you can. The Regent Honeyeater Habitat Restoration Project is a landscape-scale community effort to protect and restore all significant remnants of native woodland habitat in the agricultural district of the Lurg Hills, near Benalla, Victoria. Widespread clearing of woodland habitat has seen their numbers decline to less than 500 birds.Regent Honeyeater feeds mainly on nectar and other plant sugars. There is a lot of good news to share about our joint achievements in the past, and the big plans we have for the coming year. It is a medium-sized honeyeater, about 23 cm long and weighs up to 50g as an adult. About us . Twenty-one years of plantings in the Lurg Hills, Victoria, have seen a consolidation of the work described in the 2009 EMR feature Regent Honeyeater Habitat Restoration Project. If you want to get involved, there’s the Regent Honeyeater Project, touted as one of Australia’s most active volunteer conservation projects. Its call is quiet and melodious but it can also mimic larger honeyeaters. Prepared on behalf of the Regent Honeyeater Recovery Team by: Peter Menkhorst, Natasha Schedvin and David Geering. Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP) Natural Environment Programs Officer Glen Johnson said, “This is the most significant breeding success I have seen in 30 years of monitoring”. The Regent Honeyeater Project has established itself as one of the most active volunteer conservation projects in the nation.
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